Bow Hunting Accident - Rather Graphic Pictures

barryds

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OUCH!!! (Graphic Bow Accident Photo)
 
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barryds

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Hunting accident (may contain gruesome pics) by Lil Mike


hospital trip.




 

barryds

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Hunting accident (may contain gruesome pics) by Lil Mike

I will spare you the gruesome pics for now and tell you for one that's not deer blood on my boots and yes I am in a hospital!

I didn't want to post the nasty pics on top of the page in case whoever read didn't want to see pics.
It was a bow hunting accident. In full draw after releasing the arrow, the arrow exploded immediately upon release which the second half about 12in long struck my right thumb which of course was holding the bow. It was an Easton 350grain graphite arrow. Of course you can only imagine what the end of an exploded arrow looks like just dozens of spike ans strands of arrow. The arrow stuck into my hand which I had to get my cousins wife to pull out!! There were about 6 pieces of arrow exiting through my knuckle the tip of my finger and the back of my thumb. It all happen so fast i really don't know how of what happen. I have ALWAYS been a very safety oriented hunting and try to make sure to always put safety before success, just goes to show you can NEVER be to safe! So my mistake was i guess not properly examining the arrows before practice, which these arrow was shot hundreds of times before season. Anyway I just wanted to post this i guess to remind everyone you can be to careful and to always examine your equipment EVERY TIME you take it out for use.

Right now It's really bad, i still have pieces of arrow stuck in my finger and have to have surgery to have them removed and my finger it pretty mangled up so they only put one stitch in because they didn't want to close it up idk. anyway! It happened!

So yes typing one letter at a time..lol
So here it goes! Would have been a cool pic with the arrow stuck in my hand but I had to get it out, Quick!!!!!!
 

barryds

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'Is there an arrow in my face?' Boy, 17, lucky to be alive after crossbow fires bolt into his face in freak accident.




 

Art Of War

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OUCH!!! (Graphic Bow Accident Photo)
Must have got distracted, split second of unfocuse, had a muscle twitchs/pasm for this to occur
 

alexonedeath

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That is an excellent selection of photos of guys who've actually gone through what is my worst nightmare, being pierced by an arrow (apologies to PiercedChest). I am confused by Lil Mike's mention that "...the arrow exploded...", but I'm thinking that may just be a figure of speech.
 

barryds

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Check your Carbon Fiber arrows and Check them well!

Just about everybody is using carbon arrows these days, and for good reason. They're durable, light, versatile and accurate.

There was a time when many hunters resisted the change to carbon arrows, largely based on tales of meat contamination and splintering.

While the truth has pretty much won out over rumor, bowhunters should keep in mind there is a danger in shooting damaged carbon arrows (or arrows not properly matched to the shooter's bow).

Unlike aluminum arrows that show damage in the form of bends or dents, carbon arrows often don't show visible signs of damage. When the carbon fibers break or are cut, they weaken and can splinter during a shot.

It's important to regularly inspect your arrows for any sign of damaged carbon fibers. You should also use the flex test. Grasp the arrow at either end and bend it slightly. Listen closely for any cracking sounds. Bend the arrow enough to reveal any weaknesses, but not enough to break it if it's not damaged. Perform this test before any shooting session, and also any time your arrows hit one another during shooting.

Lest you think we're being overly cautious, this (WARNING: GRAPHIC PHOTO) photo sent in by Mandy Brenner shows what can happen. Mandy said she and her son Taylor were unaware of the need to check carbon arrows, and now she wants to help get the word out.

Carbon arrows are great, and virtually everyone here at Buckmasters uses them, but don't forget to check your arrows. We don't want to see any more photos like Taylor's. Below is the email Taylor's Mother sent us about his accident.


Whitetail Deer
 

barryds

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The series below show what happens when the archer uses an arrow that is too short, such that the arrow is overdrawn, falls off of the rest, and then is loosed. Every NAA level 1 instructor is taught how to avoid this but not everyone has the benefit of such an instructor or coach.


There is not a lot of blood because the arrow is actually acting like a cork.
Once the shaft was removed by a physician (probably involving a dremel-like cutting wheel) the blood most certainly would flow freely. After several TSAA members sent me this photo, I did get a commentary of what caused this:
" This photo was taken on a cell phone last week after the guy took his friend to Bass Pro Shop to buy his first bow. The clerk was 'assisting' him in zeroing it in, and, after shooting several arrows, making adjustments etc., the clerk accidentally handed him an arrow that was too short. When he drew back, the arrow tip fell down onto his hand and he somehow released it. They rode to the hospital with the bow in his buddy's hand because it impaled his finger also! They are both archery amateurs (I'm thinking the clerk is also?). I don't think the guy who got shot ever had held a bow prior, let alone shoot one...OUCH!"

Regardless, this is exactly what happens if one were to draw a bow (both compound AND recurve bows) back so far that the arrow falls off of the rest, and then the string is released. It will happen so fast that there will be no avoiding the punishment.


These photos below are the result of a carbon arrow shattering/breaking at the moment of release.
Judging from the arrow's fletchings the bow was likely a compound, but it can happen with recurve bows as well. Archers must always inspect their arrows (and bow and other/all gear) at appropriate times, such as first taking them out of bowcase, and after every end. One important note: A carbon arrow such as this one is composed of tiny strands of carbon fiber running the length of the shaft. As you can see, these strands separate from the resin holding them, and each one is very brittle and can break off into tiny segments. These segments are small enough to travel through a vein and into the heart, where the pumping action can force the shard into the valves of the heart, or go into other organs and be embedded there. This can be a life-threatening time bomb, so carbon arrows that fracture must be handled with the utmost care and caution, disposed of in a way that no child, or person taking out the trash, is put in danger.



 
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barryds

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When the carbon fibers break or are cut, they weaken and can splinter during a shot.
 

Art Of War

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why I always use a crossbow...
I prefer a bow and arrow, reload time much shorter.

Hmmm...think I might take up archery again....
 
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