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  1. #16
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    When someone says Arizona I imagine this:



    Have you been there?

    Really arid.

    So whats the rainest month in arizona?
    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

  2. #17
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    Yes I have. It is out in the middle of nowhere. It is up North, east of Flagstaff. It is on the Interstate freeway heading towards New Mexico. After the crater, heading East, you come across the Petrified Forest National Park, where very, very, very old trees have turned to rock. There is a road that travels through the park that you drive along and you look at scenes like the picture below.



    It is the same sort of idea as the drive-through wild anilmal safari park establishments. Here in the states we liked our drives - i.e. the 17 Mile Drive in California that goes from Monterey to Carmel along the coast and includes the Pebble Beach Golf course.



    One of the big draws are the Cypress trees, standing alone on the rocks.



    Back to Arizona weather - March, on average is the wettest month with July and August following close behind due to the monsoons. Ah, monsoon season, when Arizona gets to enforce its' "Stupid Motorist" law. Yes it is real.

    Every year, during Arizona’s summer monsoon thunderstorms, dozens of drivers attempt to cross flooded washes and roads. They become stranded in the rushing waters and need to be rescued by emergency personnel at great cost to local governments. This annual occurrence prompted the creation of Arizona traffic code Title 28-910, commonly referred to as the “Stupid Motorist Law.” Enacted in 1995, the Arizona Stupid Motorist Law allows local governments to prosecute people who knowingly enter a public street or highway or a wash that is temporarily covered by water and/or is barricaded due to flooding. Motorists can be held liable for the costs of any emergency response such as rescuing the driver and/or any passengers or removing the inoperable vehicle from a flooded public street or highway or a wash. Violation of the Stupid Motorist Law can result in a bill of $2,000 maximum for each violation.

    Since monsoon season started officially June 15, we have been bombarded with commercials about the "Stupid Motorist Law" and all of the local channels on TV have aired monsson readiness programs several times. it would be fine if they said something new. But it is the same stuff each year.

    For a real treat - hopefully you are not afraid of heights - try the Grand Canyon Skywalk. All there is between you and nothing is inches of plexiglass.

    http://www.grandcanyonskywalk.com

    See the pictures below.







    You are out over 4000 ft of nothing. The world's tallest buildings like Taipei 101 and the Petronas Towers can easily fit under it with plenty of room to spare. I know they say things pass and exceed structural requirements, but I still am not convinced. For now, I will stay with my feet firmly planted on terra firma.

  3. #18
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    You live in an interesting state, I would love to visit. What month do you recommend?

    I am not used to extreme heat, can pass out if it goes above 40'C in the shade.

    Those tree - they look huge!!!

    North America is a big insane and very old continent.

    I will definately go to Arizona in my visit to the US.
    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

  4. #19
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    Its noon here, pouring with rain, severe thunderstorms day and night.

    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

  5. #20
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meatpie View Post
    You live in an interesting state, I would love to visit. What month do you recommend?

    I am not used to extreme heat, can pass out if it goes above 40'C in the shade.

    Those tree - they look huge!!!

    North America is a big insane and very old continent.

    I will definately go to Arizona in my visit to the US.
    I would say sometime February through April. It can reach 100' in May. During that time frame it is still comfortable in the deserts and cooler in the mountains/hills. You can go for hikes, visit the Red Rock country around Sedona, partake of winter activities - skiing, etc. in what is called the "Snowbowl" up north, and explore the lakes and rivers to the north. If you wish, you can make a trip to Puerto Penasco, Mexico and explore the Gulf of California area down there. There are US travel advisories against going, but it is up to the individual. Plus, Las Vegas is only 5-6 hours away by car and Southern California - San Diego and the Los Angeles metroplex, are only 8-10 hours away. There is much to do and see around. Just stay away from May to October - 100'+/40'+ is the norm, not the exception.

  6. #21
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    They are saying we are supposed to get our first monsoon between now and the weekend. Hopefully, there will not be a haboob first. See picture below. They occur in only two places on Earth. The Sahara desert and Arizona.

    A haboob (dust storm) rolls in from the Gila River Indian reservation northward towards the south side of South Mountain in Phoenix, Arizona.



    They turn day into night. They winds force sand and dust through cracks around windows and doors and through your car's ventilation system. Traffic comes to a stand still on the roads because visibility is reduced to zero. And the debris they carry play hell with auto windscreens/windshields, paint jobs, pools and more. First everything is covered by dust, then it rains, forms mud where mud should not be, and then just for fun, we get the flash flooding and standing water in the streets. Just some the fun quirks of living in the desert.




  7. #22
    slut corpse killme's Avatar
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    wow,haboob.Good.

    Only little flooding here.But i am Ok,thanks for asking,i am living on 7th floor. lol
    This time,the flood was very quick and unsuspected. At least 11 deaths in few ours. I am going out to search for cute drowned guys :sm (42)::sm (32):


  8. #23
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    I thought dust storms in the US are a thing of the past.

    killme, I heard about the flooding in the czech republic, thunderstorms and rain here too.

    I got caught up in a storm today and was drenched.

    Thanks for the pics guys!!!
    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

  9. #24
    Slippery when dead dogfood's Avatar
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    It's hot as boiling period blood here.

  10. #25
    Forum Elite verlup1's Avatar
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    Arizona looks really interesting. I've never been away from the east coast, believe it or not! I have family that's moved out to Arizona and found the dry heat intolerable. I still want to check it out now that I've learned more about it from here.

  11. #26
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meatpie View Post
    I thought dust storms in the US are a thing of the past.

    killme, I heard about the flooding in the czech republic, thunderstorms and rain here too.

    I got caught up in a storm today and was drenched.

    Thanks for the pics guys!!!
    The "Dust Bowl" of the early 1900's is long gone. It was immortalized in novels such as The Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck. The reason we get them is based on location and weather patterns - valleys and mountains combined with sudden wind shifts and downdrafts resulting from storm fronts moving in and over the area. I had no idea we had haboobs until I got caught in one on the freeway during evening rush hour. People already drive like they do not have a clue and now they were weaving in and out of parked traffic, driving down shoulders and I wondered why - until I looked in my rear view mirror and saw what at first I thought was a tornado. People just stopped in the middle of the freeway and I was caught in the middle of them so I had no choice but to stop and ride out the storm parked on the freeway. If we are lucky, we get the heavy downpours after the dust storm and it cleans things up for a little while. An hour or two after a decent rain, except for a very random puddle, you cannot tell that rain fell as it looks as parched after the rain as it did before.

  12. #27
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogfood View Post
    It's hot as boiling period blood here.
    Where is here? And from your description, it does not sound all too pleasant either. :sm (30):

  13. #28
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    Have you noticed the effect of global warming in Arizona?

    In Bulgaria, 2007 and 2008 were the hottest on record since measurements began 100 years ago.

    I wrote an article on wikipedia about it, it was unlike I've never seen before.

    Dust and heat directly from the Sahara desert:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_Bulgarian_heat_wave

    Today is more of the same: thunderstorms and rain.
    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

  14. #29
    Forum Inhabitant Fideliodemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by verlup1 View Post
    Arizona looks really interesting. I've never been away from the east coast, believe it or not! I have family that's moved out to Arizona and found the dry heat intolerable. I still want to check it out now that I've learned more about it from here.
    You have to be a lover of the sun to want to move out here. I am here due to a family request. I was the only member of the remaining extended family that did not live in Arizona and I finally gave in to family peer pressure and reluctantly came out. I cannot stand it here. I will take 40' below zero with daily blizzards before I will ever enjoy the heat. They try to qualify it by saying it is a "dry heat". True, we have less humidity than the East Coast and such and 100'F with 3% humidity here is possibly slightly more tolerable than 100'F with 80% or more. I hate that feeling when just after you walk out of the house on your way to the car you feel like you need to go take another shower or at least get a towel and dry off. The thing people forget is that when it is 100'+ outside, it is 140'+ in your closed up car. So when you get in, your fingers leave permanent imprints and indentions on the steering wheel, if you are wearing shorts and have any kind of non-fabric material on your seats, expect a burn in places you do not want one, and any metal of any sort is a 2nd degree burn just waiting to happen - i.e. ignition. Seat-belt buckles are much too hot to touch and the outside door handle will burn the fingerprints right off of your fingers. This is if you have one of those "sunscreens" that go inside the windshield. Just imagine if you did not. And forget the A/C. By the time it cools down enough to make a difference, you are already at your destination or so close that the damage has alrady been done. My feelings on the subject is that you can dress for the cold - you can add layers and modify your coat, hat, scarf, boots, and gloves accordingly. On the other hand, at least in the prudish USA, there is only so much you can take off legally to attempt to get comfortable in extreme heat. To each their own, I guess. :sm (21):

  15. #30
    Forum Administrator Meatpie's Avatar
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    As the sun ages, it will get brighter and hotter. Eventually it will become so hot on earth rock will melt.

    Earth definately dies in fire, if they are still humans living on it, they will be all toast.
    m/ ^_^ m/ "The goal of all life is death" - Sigmund Freud

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