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Meatpie
25-10-08, 10:37 AM
Q&A about all known possible ways to off yourself.

http://fringe.davesource.com/Fringe/Information/Suicide_FAQ.html

verlup1
25-10-08, 02:28 PM
So many poisons! I never knew.

Meatpie
25-10-08, 03:09 PM
I liked the one with paint

verlup1
25-10-08, 04:15 PM
I didn't see that one, I'll have to take a look.
The Paracetamol (aka acetaminopren / tylenol) overdose would kill me right away, as I'm severely allergic to it. But I might not look very good from such a death since I might swell up badly and end up looking like a very fat person. That's what happened when I accidentally took some last time, I couldn't fit into my own pants, my eyes swelled too and I looked Asian. The ambulance came and I was hospitalized. I wonder if a person that dies from such a reaction shrinks back down from being swollen after death.

Meatpie
25-10-08, 04:24 PM
I didn't see that one, I'll have to take a look.
The Paracetamol (aka acetaminopren / tylenol) overdose would kill me right away, as I'm severely allergic to it. But I might not look very good from such a death since I might swell up badly and end up looking like a very fat person. That's what happened when I accidentally took some last time, I couldn't fit into my own pants, my eyes swelled too and I looked Asian. The ambulance came and I was hospitalized. I wonder if a person that dies from such a reaction shrinks back down from being swollen after death.

:totalshock: Oh mate I am sorry to hear. When was that? Its strange how you can can allergic to paracetamol, this is probably to most widespread drug in the word.

I am allergic to nophilin and nearly died in hospital as a kid. Thanks to my mom they saved me.

I puked and had a seizure. So if I want to kill myself one pill will be enough.

On your questions about swelling - a elderly man I knew croaked like that.

He had renal failure and got so swollen and filled with fluid he gained 20 kilos.

So he was 60 kilos but at his funeral he was 90 or more. His wife so shocked she cried her eyes out.

They couldn't carry him coffin couldn't take him, his suit woudlnt fit, shoes either.

So hope that answers your questions - although some fluid is lost after death if its large amounts it reamains in the body and you get all puffy and green and then burst in your casket.

verlup1
25-10-08, 04:48 PM
That answers my question! It's very strange how that can happen. Sadly I would be a swollen mess if I offed myself with paracetamol. But I've also heard that sometimes when the allergy is bad enough ingesting the poison kills so fast that the body just stops before any swelling or redness can begin. That's what happened to a girlfriend of a friend of mine. She just dropped dead the split second after eating something with shellfish in it.
I had my allergic reaction three times. The first when I was a teenager and I never knew what caused it. The second time in my later teens like 18 or 19, I realized it was the Tylenol I took. The third time was accidental when I took something I didn't know had paracetamol in it. Each time it happened the reaction was worse. What's nophilin? A
pain medication too? I'm glad you survived, scary wasn't it? You need to be careful because other medications can have it as an ingredient. At least you didn't swell up, did you?

Meatpie
25-10-08, 05:09 PM
shellfish? oh man thats disgusting. dead girl with shellfish in her stomach.

no I didn't swell. A stupid nurse injected it right into my veins - as you said no time to swell

the allergen connects directly with mast cells and basophils in the blood and can kill you right away

nophilin is no longer used I think

Its a potent drug that dilates the blood vessels, gives you strenght etc...

verlup1
25-10-08, 06:02 PM
Thanks for the information. I like to hear the process. Its interesting. Good thing it's no longer used.

Meatpie
25-10-08, 06:12 PM
what process mate?

verlup1
25-10-08, 06:53 PM
"the allergen connects directly with mast cells and basophils in the blood and can kill you right away"
I wonder if formaldehyde can kill. What if you work in a mortuary and have regular "activity" with the bodies. I read somewhere years ago that some male embalmers were starting to develop breasts! Scientists believed the formaldehyde could be causing this. How gross! But I wonder if there could be deadly side effects to too much exposure. Another reason why I believe plastination should become the standard for preparing the dead, at least the hot dead guys.

Meatpie
25-10-08, 06:57 PM
Its a complicated process and takes time to develop. Basically its the classic body - antibody reaction that we have all studied in our biology classes.

Allergic responses can be divided into two phases. The first is an acute response (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_%28medical%29) that occurs immediately after exposure to an allergen. This phase can either subside or progress into a "late phase reaction" which can substantially prolong the symptoms of a response, and result in tissue damage.

Acute response

In the early stages of allergy, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_helper_cell), which belongs to a subset of T cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_cell) that produce a cytokine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine) called interleukin-4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interleukin-4) (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphocytes) called B cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_cell), whose role is production of antibodies. Coupled with signals provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as IgE.

Secreted IgE circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fc_receptor) called FcεRI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fc%CE%B5RI)) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mast_cell) and basophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basophil), which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen.

If later exposure to the same allergen occurs, the allergen can bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils. Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more than one IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same allergenic molecule, and activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and basophils undergo a process called degranulation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degranulation), during which they release histamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine) and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine), interleukins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interleukin), leukotrienes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leukotriene), and prostaglandins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostaglandin)) from their granules (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granule) into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasodilation), mucous (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucous) secretion, nerve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerve) stimulation and smooth muscle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_muscle) contraction.

This results in rhinorrhea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinorrhea), itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis. Depending on the individual, allergen, and mode of introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis), or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the respiratory system and eczema is localized to the dermis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermis).

Late-phase response

After the chemical mediators of the acute response subside, late phase responses can often occur. This is due to the migration of other leukocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leukocyte) such as neutrophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrophil), lymphocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphocyte), eosinophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eosinophil) and macrophages (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrophage) to the initial site. The reaction is usually seen 2-24 hours after the original reaction. Cytokines from mast cells may also play a role in the persistence of long-term effects. Late phase responses seen in asthma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthma) are slightly different from those seen in other allergic responses, although they are still caused by release of mediators from eosinophils, and are still dependent on activity of TH2 cells.

JMsidious
29-10-08, 10:44 AM
Its a complicated process and takes time to develop. Basically its the classic body - antibody reaction that we have all studied in our biology classes.

Allergic responses can be divided into two phases. The first is an acute response (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_%28medical%29) that occurs immediately after exposure to an allergen. This phase can either subside or progress into a "late phase reaction" which can substantially prolong the symptoms of a response, and result in tissue damage.

Acute response

In the early stages of allergy, a type I hypersensitivity reaction against an allergen, encountered for the first time, causes a response in a type of immune cell called a TH2 lymphocyte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_helper_cell), which belongs to a subset of T cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T_cell) that produce a cytokine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine) called interleukin-4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interleukin-4) (IL-4). These TH2 cells interact with other lymphocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphocytes) called B cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_cell), whose role is production of antibodies. Coupled with signals provided by IL-4, this interaction stimulates the B cell to begin production of a large amount of a particular type of antibody known as IgE.

Secreted IgE circulates in the blood and binds to an IgE-specific receptor (a kind of Fc receptor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fc_receptor) called FcεRI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fc%CE%B5RI)) on the surface of other kinds of immune cells called mast cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mast_cell) and basophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basophil), which are both involved in the acute inflammatory response. The IgE-coated cells, at this stage are sensitized to the allergen.

If later exposure to the same allergen occurs, the allergen can bind to the IgE molecules held on the surface of the mast cells or basophils. Cross-linking of the IgE and Fc receptors occurs when more than one IgE-receptor complex interacts with the same allergenic molecule, and activates the sensitized cell. Activated mast cells and basophils undergo a process called degranulation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degranulation), during which they release histamine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine) and other inflammatory chemical mediators (cytokines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine), interleukins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interleukin), leukotrienes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leukotriene), and prostaglandins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostaglandin)) from their granules (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granule) into the surrounding tissue causing several systemic effects, such as vasodilation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasodilation), mucous (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mucous) secretion, nerve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerve) stimulation and smooth muscle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_muscle) contraction.

This results in rhinorrhea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinorrhea), itchiness, dyspnea, and anaphylaxis. Depending on the individual, allergen, and mode of introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis), or localized to particular body systems; asthma is localized to the respiratory system and eczema is localized to the dermis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermis).

Late-phase response

After the chemical mediators of the acute response subside, late phase responses can often occur. This is due to the migration of other leukocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leukocyte) such as neutrophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrophil), lymphocytes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphocyte), eosinophils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eosinophil) and macrophages (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrophage) to the initial site. The reaction is usually seen 2-24 hours after the original reaction. Cytokines from mast cells may also play a role in the persistence of long-term effects. Late phase responses seen in asthma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthma) are slightly different from those seen in other allergic responses, although they are still caused by release of mediators from eosinophils, and are still dependent on activity of TH2 cells.


The thing is, most of the time your first exposure to the substance you are allergic to does little to nothing. The body may have a reaction, but it's usually caught in time and mild. But it's the subsequent exposures that are the deadliest. My mom is allergic to bees - first sting mild reaction. Years later, the next one put her into histamine shock and nearly killed her- she carries an epinephrine pen now religiously. That's likely what happened to the shellfish girl.